Archive for Fleas

3 Insects Your Pet Should Avoid

398px German Shepherd Dog sitting leash 199x300 3 Insects Your Pet Should AvoidPet lovers enjoy the companionship of their beloved animals. Keeping them happy and healthy is a high priority for the owners of these affectionate furry friends. Unfortunately, there are harmful situations to keep them away from. Insects can wreak havoc on pets and harm their health. Here are the critters you’ll need your pet to steer clear of to ensure they stay content and carefree.

1. Fleas

Fleas are wingless insects that survive off the blood of their hosts. Pets usually come by these pests from other animals that come in contact with their surroundings. Raccoons, coyotes, skunks and opossums can leave flea eggs in your backyard that attach themselves to pets when they go outside. Untreated cats and dogs who have fleas in the neighborhood can also infect your pet with these pests.

Although they are mostly associated with harming animals for their well-being, they can also feed on the blood of humans. They’re incredibly small, brown insects who can live up to one and a half years with a steady food supply. Pets can even swallow fleas and become infected with hookworms.

Flea infestations can be very troublesome for pets and their owners if they’re not properly taken care of in time. Pets should avoid contact with animals who carry fleas. To avoid these pests, it’s important to give pets the proper treatment through topical medications, baths or pills. If your pet gets fleas, the entire home should be treated.

2. Ticks

Ticks tend to have more hosts than fleas. Their victims tend to include cats, dogs, birds, snakes, rodents, opossums, squirrels, deer, raccoons and humans.

They’re known for their chestnut brown color and feature white spots or streaks on their backs. They can live anywhere from a few weeks to three years with a blood supply. They can lay thousands of eggs at once; however, they will die soon afterward. These blood-sucking creatures can live through near-freezing temperatures. Ticks tend to be tougher to rid of than fleas. They can also transmit Lyme disease to humans and dogs.

Pets should stay away from wooded areas where ticks reside. Owners should regularly check their pets for these pests and remove the tick immediately as soon as one is spotted. There are pills and topical medications for pets to take to avoid contact with ticks.

3. Mosquitoes

Mosquitoes are insects who consume blood from animals and humans. They can live up to two weeks. While feasting on their blood, they can transmit dangerous diseases to their hosts like filariasis, malaria and yellow fever.

Although fur and hair can protect your pet from mosquitos, their ears and nose are vulnerable to a mosquito’s bite. Known for their long legs and slender body, they are irritating to pets that enjoy the outdoors during the spring and summer. Even worse, mosquito bites can also cause heartworm in animals if they’re not protected. Symptoms can manifest themselves and cause coughing, vomiting or fainting. They may also find it difficult to breathe and have a tough time exercising.

It’s also important for pets to avoid areas with standing water as this is where mosquitos thrive. Pet owners can protect animals by placing mosquito repellant on their skin. To alleviate the pain associated with mosquito bites, there are antibacterial creams to soothe your pet’s irritation.

Finding out how to protect insects from your animals can be a challenge. However, with the right experts by your side, it can be done. For more information, contact Clegg’s online or phone at 888-672-5344 to rid of the pests in your home.

 

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Fleas & Ticks: Not Just a Problem for Your Pet

Fleas and ticks aren’t picky. Both fleas and ticks normally live outdoors, but they can easily move inside by entering your home through open doors or windows, come in with you or your pets, enter your home on mice or rats, or even be carried in on items you bring inside. Once indoors, they may jump onto furniture, rugs or carpets to lay eggs. In no time flat, you may find you have a flea or tick infestation. You don’t even have to have pets.

More About Fleas

Flea OrientalRat 300x204 Fleas & Ticks: Not Just a Problem for Your PetMost people with pets notice the telltale signs of fleas when their dogs or cats begin scratching more frequently, chewing on themselves or losing patches of fur. You can easily confirm the presence of fleas by combing your dog or cat with a narrow-tooth flea comb. Live fleas and eggs will be visible in the fur you comb out. While Fido may be the typical host for fleas, these pests are more than happy to use humans for a meal. Since the fleas often make themselves at home in your carpeting, you may recognize you have a problem when you suddenly find unexplained bites on your feet and ankles.

The most common symptom reported from flea bites are red, itchy areas, however fleas may also carry tapeworms that can be transmitted to dogs, cats and children, and they have been known to transmit Typhoid Fever and the Bubonic Plague, though these diseases are not common in our state.

More About Ticks

Tick LoneStar 300x284 Fleas & Ticks: Not Just a Problem for Your PetWhen the weather warms up, ticks also become very active. Ticks can come inside on your dogs or cats, or may attach themselves to you or your clothes. Ticks may transmit diseases such as Lyme disease or Rocky Mountain spotted fever through their bites. Several types of ticks may be found in North Carolina, however not all of them carry the same potential diseases. If you find a tick that has attached to your skin, remove it carefully (see detailed instructions on how to remove a tick) ensuring you get the entire tick and wash the area with soap and water. If you see any signs of a bullseye rash at the bite location, or if you have any other symptoms, contact your doctor and let him/her know you were bitten by a tick.

Treating Fleas & Ticks

Treating a flea or tick infestation is normally a three-step approach, with the steps taking place at the same time. If you have pets, there are various treatment options available, with some being more effective than others. In our experience, a flea collar is the least effective option, while a systemic product provided by your veterinarian is the most effective. Your lawn should also be treated to prevent a reinfestation. Finally, you must treat the inside of your house with an insecticide to kill the fleas and ticks. We recommend washing your pet’s bedding and drying on high heat. You should also remove the vacuum bag (or empty canister contents into a bag and seal) after vacuuming the carpets and place it in the outdoor trash sealed in a plastic bag to ensure any live fleas or eggs are gone. After the inside of your home is treated, you should vacuum every three days for the next two weeks, discarding the vacuum bag each time. Read more about getting rid of fleas and ticks in your home.

Questions about fleas or ticks? Ask us!