Archive for Pest Control

Signs of a Rodent Infestation in Your Warehouse

RatYour business’s warehouse is a hub of storage and distribution, but it can also be a perfect place for rodents to hide. Both rats and mice prefer hidden areas away from predators, especially when they are nesting. Although you may not see the rodents in your warehouse, there are telltale clues that point to an infestation. At Clegg’s Termite & Pest Control, we want your North Carolina business to be rodent-free.

Excrement

The simplest way to determine a rodent infestation is through excrement discovery. Commonly overlooked as pebbles or rocks, rat and mice droppings are typically near walls where they scurry in the night. Appearing black or brown, these pellets can even be slightly shiny. Take a strong flashlight and shine it along the warehouse’s perimeter. Try to access hard-to-reach areas to find even more excrement evidence. By following the droppings, you may even discover their main nesting area.

Travel Clues

Become an investigator by looking for travel clues. Look along ceiling beams, pipes and side passageways. You are looking for paw prints, tail marks and even greasy stains. Rats and mice move through confined spaces to find the best areas to hide, allowing their fur to catch oil, grime and grease. They may leave that grease directly on your clean warehouse floor. Any areas with lumber often leave fine sawdust on the floor. Examine this area as well for paw prints in the dust.

Chewing Evidence

You may run a clean warehouse, but rodents make a mess in corners and along walls. Inspect any wood, such as fixtures, pallets or even cardboard boxes. Rodents chew on these items, leaving gnawing marks and sawdust behind. You may be able to follow the gnaw marks to their main hiding place, or the chewing area could be confined to one spot. Call Clegg’s Termite & Pest Control if you’re unsure about your infestation’s severity.

Nesting Instinct

Rodents naturally want a safe place to nest, but they also need materials. Your warehouse is potentially full of choice items, including newspaper and packing supplies. Take a look at your loose materials, pinpointing any torn or missing areas. Rodents literally shred materials to create a nest when they are ready to reproduce. Finding damaged materials gives you an idea of what to look for in any known hiding places.

At Clegg’s Termite & Pest Control, we strive to keep your warehouse clear of all rodent infestations. Keep your business and employees happy and healthy with our professional services today.

Image via: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rat_agouti.jpg

Snail or Slug: Which One is Eating My Plants?

Now that spring has sprung, and the weather is warming up, many in North Carolina are planning their landscaping and planting their gardens. As you go on through the season, you might find that some of your plants have irregular holes in them, that the edges of the leaves are getting eaten, or your fruit, like strawberries, are being eaten away. You might also see shoots and stems being eaten. All of these can be signs that you have slugs or snails, perhaps even both, in your garden.

Other Signs of Slugs and Snails

SnailIn general, slugs and snails will do the same type of damage in your garden, and in either case, you may notice other signs, as well. Both of these creatures live underground much of the time, so though you might not see the snails or slugs, but you might notice the distinctive slime trail that they leave in their wake. This slime trail can be seen for several days, assuming it doesn’t rain.

Another sign that you might have slugs or snails in your garden is that the plants they love the most, like hostas or delphiniums are all but destroyed. If you don’t have these plants, you will need to rely on the other signs.

Slugs, Snails, or Both?

SlugWhen you see this damage, you might be wondering if you have snails or slugs. The truth is, you could have snails, slugs, or both. There isn’t a lot of difference when it comes to the damage that snails versus slugs bring to your garden.

Instead, you will find that the main difference between them is how they look. Snails, of course, have a shell on their back. Because they have this shell, snails will need to eat foods that are higher in calcium.

Slugs don’t have the same dietary needs. You might find, if you have snails over slugs that calcium rich plants like kale, collards, garlic, turnips, and okra are all targets for snails. Slugs just like plants of all types, so they likely will not focus on one plant over another.

If you notice that you have damage from slugs or snails in your garden, you should contact a professional pest control company like Clegg’s Termite & Pest Control, LLC for assistance, especially if other home treatments have not worked. Though other pests could certainly cause similar damage, slugs and snails often are more destructive than others.

Images via: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Common_snail.jpg and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Slug_pic.jpg

Termite Identification Tips: How to Identify the Termites You Have

If you have termites on your North Carolina property, you will certainly notice the signs. Some of the signs associated with termites that you might see are mud tubes, wings on the ground, or even a sawdust-like material on counters, in sinks, and in other areas of your home.

At the first sign of termites, you should reach out to a professional pest control company because usually you won’t notice their presence until the damage has already been done.

There are two different types of destructive termites in North Carolina and here are some tips on identifying the type you have:

Eastern Subterranean Termites

Subterranean TermitesThe eastern subterranean termite is extremely destructive, and they tend to eat the inside of wood, leaving only a shell behind. This is important because the timber might look perfectly fine from the outside, but it could be extremely weak from the inside. As you can imagine, this could be disastrous if it happens in your home.

These termites are very small, only about 1/8 inch in size. They have large mandibles, or pincers, on their heads and are dark in color. You will know if you have these termites as you will notice the presence of mud tubes on the side of your home and likely see swarming or wings on the ground as the weather warms up in spring. Each colony of subterranean termites will contain thousands of insects, some colonies closing in on a million individuals.

Drywood Termites

Drywood TermiteThe other type of termites you might see in North Carolina that are highly destructive are drywood termites. These termites will often be found inside of the home feasting on your wood furniture.

The main sign that you have drywood termites is the presence of a sawdust-like substance on, in, and around wood in your home. This substance is actually termite feces that they kick out of the small irregularly placed holes they drill through wood. These holes are another sign that you have drywood termites, not subterranean termites.

If you see any sign of termites, first contact a pest control specialist like Clegg’s Termite & Pest Control, LLC, then take some time to identify the type you have. Based on the signs, you might be able to do both at the same time. Remember, the sooner you contact a professional, the less damage you will be dealing with, which will significantly lower the cost of repair.

Images via: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:K8085-6.jpg and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Macro_Termite_Soldier.jpg

Steps to Take When You Encounter a Brown Recluse

brown recluse spider controlAre you dealing with spiders? Whether you have a fear of spiders or not, you probably don’t want them in your home, especially if they are brown recluses. Here are some steps to take if you do encounter a brown recluse:

1. Identify it as a Brown Recluse
First, it is important to identify if the spider is a brown recluse. The nickname for a brown recluse is the violin spider because of a mark on its back resembling a dark brown violin pointing backwards. As its name suggests, it is brown in color and only has six eyes instead of the usual eight, with one pair in front and another pair on either side. Its body is only about 3/8 inches long, and its legs have no stripes.

2. Don’t Panic
Second, don’t panic if it is a brown recluse. Although brown recluse spiders have a reputation of being extremely dangerous, experts say most bites heal quickly without any serious consequences. The severity of a brown recluse’s bite depends on the amount of venom injected. Redness and swelling typically result, although the bite may go undetected for several hours. If you are bitten by a brown recluse, though, and experience medical concerns appearing to be serious, you should seek the aid of a medical professional.

3. Be Aware of Hiding Places
If you encounter a brown recluse, chances are fairly good that others are around. Therefore, you should watch for places they may be hiding, such as in your slippers or clothes lying on the floor. This is where neatness becomes a virtue. Because brown recluse spiders like to live under and between items, such as cardboard boxes or wooden boards, you can reduce the possibility of an encounter by eliminating clutter. Remove bed skirts and ruffles to help keep spiders out of your bed, and store firewood away from the house.

4. Hire Pest Control Services
One of the best solutions for eradicating brown recluse spiders is to use the services of Clegg’s Pest Control. They have the necessary knowledge and experience to formulate an effective treatment plan that will work well for you. Their service personnel are knowledgeable in what areas to treat, and they have the specialized equipment to get the job done right.

Brown recluse spiders are nearly impossible to eradicate completely. However, by implementing the measures outlined above, you should be able to drastically reduce their number and avoid painful contact with them in the future.

Request pest control services online or call us at 888-672-5344.

Termite Season is Coming!

Subterranean Termites

The termites are coming, the termites are coming! In reality, termites are in North Carolina eating wood and other cellulose based materials year round, but spring is the time when most people first discover they have a termite problem.

Signs of termites

In spring each year as the weather warms up, winged termites take flight in an attempt to leave and start new colonies. When they swarm inside your house, they head toward the windows and daylight. They cannot escape and die there at the window, leaving piles of termite wings on the sill and surrounding areas. Outside, you may find piles of wings around the foundation. These piles are a sure sign there is an infestation close by.

Mud tubes are another indicator of a termite infestation. These tubes may be found inside or outside your house, usually (but not always) low to the ground around the foundation of the home.

As termites eat wood, the surface may not initially appear damaged, but the wood will sound hollow. In other cases, the damage may look like paint that has gotten wet and has bubbles. As you clean your baseboards, look for signs of damage or listen for the wood to sound hollow when you tap it.

You may also find signs of live termites around the foundation. Look for wet areas or signs of damage near your home, pull mulch or dirt back from the house and look for live termites.

Don’t panic

While termites eat day and night, there’s no need to call 9-1-1! Do have a termite professional come and inspect your property to confirm that the problem is indeed termites. If you do have termites, there are several treatment options available, including liquid treatments and baiting systems. Depending on the severity of the damage, you may need to have repairs done to any wood the termites have destroyed.

If you believe you may have termites, don’t wait to get your home inspected! Give Clegg’s a call. Our pest professionals can help tell you if you have termites and offer a solution to meet your specific needs. Contact us today.

Learn more about termites in these related articles:

What You Need to Know About Termites

A Seasonal Guide to Termites

 

 

Planting Your Garden With Pest Control in Mind

Vegetable GardenCreating a garden with pest control in mind can help to avoid problems down the road. Maintenance and taking the proper steps to prevent problems from occurring in the first place is the key to keeping harmful insects and pesky critters out of your garden. Here are some tips for keeping pests off of your plants, which will create a more successful gardening experience.

The use of natural planting is very useful in controlling pests in gardens, because it will attract beneficial insects. Planting marigolds, onions and chives between vegetable plants will help ward off garden pests. Set shallow containers of beer throughout the area, and the slugs will crawl in them and drown. Invest in fencing and netting to keep critters out of the garden area and plant wild flowers around the area to attract bees, which can help to keep bothersome creatures away.

In addition, only plant the vegetal varieties that are suited to your locality. Familiarize yourself with the types of insects and diseases that are common in your zone, and plant resistant selections. Use row covers and stake plants to keep them off the ground and away from the dampness. Inspect your plants daily, and observe for signs of garden pests. Look at the undersides of the leaves for holes, wilting, webs and discoloration.

Always identify the problem before trying to treat it. You can often remove eggs masses by hand before they become a problem. Keep soil mulched for good drainage, and immediately dispose of any bug infested and diseased plants. Eradicate all dead plants in the fall to avoid reproduction of garden pests in the spring, and rotate your crops every year to help prevent reoccurring problems.

Despite all your efforts, you may have the urge to use pesticides. While some of these may be effective, they can also be harmful to pets or humans. Another option, if you live in North Carolina, Clegg’s Termite and Pest Control has numerous locations throughout the state and can aide in helping you control garden pests in a safe manner.

Request pest control service online or call Clegg’s at 888-672-5344.

Image via: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lettuces_in_Hyde_Hall_Vegetable_Garden.JPG

Pests & Your Store: The Importance of Back Room Cleanliness

Back-RoomCleanliness is key when it comes to operating a store. Even a minor pest problem can result in diminished sales and a negative reputation among customers. Stores that sell food and other materials that are naturally inviting to pests may have a difficult time keeping the back room pest-free. The back room is especially vulnerable because it is often used for storage and is not subjected to the same level of scrutiny as a store’s more public areas are. The professionals at Cleggs can eliminate existing infestations and also offer suggestions for maintaining store room conditions that will discourage future infestations.

Insects and rodents are attracted to areas in which there is a large supply of food. Therefore, grocery and other food stores are a main target for these pests. While having food in a grocery store is an inevitable requirement, there are steps stores can take to make food sources less attractive and less accessible to pests. For example, all food items should be stored in durable containers that pests cannot easily infiltrate. Product storage containers should be secure enough to eliminate food smells that may attract pests.

Spills are also a common occurrence in stores that sell food items. Store employees should remain vigilant and clean up spills as soon as they happen. Cleaning up spills quickly will reduce the likelihood that pests will smell the spilled food item and invade the area.

In many stores, the trash collection area is located directly outside the back room. For this reason, it is imperative that dumpsters be kept as orderly as possible. Products that may be a food source for pests should be contained and disposed of neatly, and stores should never allow food debris to remain on the ground outside dumpsters. Cardboard boxes should not be left around the back room and trash areas as clutter and cardboard can make these areas more conducive to pest invasion.

Keeping the back room clean by eliminating clutter, discouraging and quickly cleaning any spills that may occur, and storing food properly are only the beginning when it comes to effective pest control. Partnering with an experienced pest control service provider can help businesses maintain a clean, comfortable environment for their employees and customers. At Cleggs, we have experience and understanding of how different pests operate. Therefore, we are able to deliver effective solutions for a variety of pest concerns.

Request service for your business online or call Clegg’s at 888-672-5344.

Image via: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Removing_box_bale_from_machine_in_Walmart_back_room.jpg

Seasonal Guide to Termites

north carolina termite pest control

When the weather starts to warm again in the spring, people begin noticing signs of termites and our phone begins ringing. In some cases, homeowners find signs of termites when they begin sprucing up their homes. In others, termites may swarm inside the home or around the foundation. As soon as you think you might have a termite issue, you need to call a professional and have your home inspected.

What are the signs I have termites?

The most common type of termite found in North Carolina is the subterranean termite. These insects live in colonies underground and eat cellulose products like wood and paper. You may find damage to wood beams in your crawlspace or even to baseboards. We recently had a situation where termites had gotten into books stored on a bookshelf and eaten holes in the books! The other obvious sign of infestation is mud tubes on the interior or exterior walls, especially near the ground, or around doors, including the garage door framing at the expansion gap on the ground. One homeowner walked into her shower one day and discovered mud tubes that had appeared overnight right at the top of the tile surround. You may also see swarms of termites around mating season in the spring and summer or find piles of discarded termite wings around windows.

If the inspector confirms I have termites, what happens next?

Once our trained technicians identify a termite infestation, they will review the extent of the problem and detail the location(s) of the damage, and then create a customized treatment plan for your home. They will review the treatment options with you and answer any questions you may have. You can then choose an option for treatment. If the damage is severe, you may also need to involve a contractor to handle the repairs to your property.

What termite treatment options are available?

For subterranean termites, a liquid termiticide is usually applied around the foundation of your home. For homes built on a slab, the concrete will be drilled and the termiticide pumped under the concrete. Some homeowners may have high moisture areas or they may be concerned with the impact of some types of liquid termiticides on the environment. It is important to note that there is a new liquid termiticide that only affects termites- Altriset® (Syngenta). Altriset specifically paralyzes the jaw muscles of termites, and therefore will not harm beneficial insects like honey bees. Altriset is termed a “reduced risk” insecticide by the Environmental Protection Agency, and therefore has no signal word like other EPA pesticides require.

A second option is a baiting system like the Sentricon Termite Colony Elimination system. In this type of system, baiting stations are set around the perimeter of your house and termiticide bait is placed in the stations for the termites to collect and take back to the colony. If an infestation already exists, a liquid termiticide may be applied first and the baiting system installed as a preventive measure. Our recommendations will be based upon your specific situation.

What can I do to ensure I don’t get termites?

When new homes are built, they are treated with a termiticide product that protects the home for around 5 years. It is the homeowner’s responsibility to have a new treatment applied after the original loses effectiveness. Both liquid and baiting options are available. Clegg’s liquid termite protection plan requires an annual termite inspection. This allows us to ensure the treatment is working. Once the initial application has lost effectiveness, a termiticide booster treatment is applied and the annual inspection process continues. Of course, one of the most important things you can do is be vigilant. Make sure there is no excess moisture in and around your home that can attract termites or other wood-boring insects. Keep your eyes open for signs of termites and follow some common sense precautions like storing firewood away from the foundation of your home, keeping bushes and trees trimmed away from the house, and not piling mulch against the foundation. Again, if you see any signs of termites, don’t ignore them!

If you see damage to the wood around your home, you could have termites or other wood-destroying insects that result in similar damage. At the first sign of trouble, you should have a professional inspect the property to see exactly what you are dealing with and recommend how to best treat the problem. To learn more, read our article, What You Need to Know About Termites.

Clegg’s offers free termite inspections. Call us today to schedule an appointment at the first sign you might have a termite infestation.

Preventing Pests and Saving Energy Bills: How TAP Insulation Does Both

Clegg's offers TAP insulationOne pest control measure you probably don’t think of too much is your insulation. Believe it or not, insulation can make a big difference in having unwanted guests inside your home versus outside.

One of our solutions is TAP Insulation. We are a certified provider and recommend it due to its variety of benefits.

Pest Control Assistance

Made primarily from recycled paper, TAP Insulation is constructed by putting the paper through a disc-mill. The newly created cotton-boll-like substance is then infused with borates.

TAP Insulation is “loose-fill” and works in conjunction with your existing insulation. This provides your home with increased benefits including pest control. The insulation helps prevent common pests such as roaches, ants, termites, and silverfish from nesting in your attic and walls.

Reduces Energy Bills

TAP Insulation also provides your home with additional insulation to keep your home warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer. This allows homeowners to reduce the amount of times they need to turn on the heat or A/C.

Overall this installation provides your home with a long-term way to reduce your energy bills.

Noise Control

Due to its makeup, TAP Insulation provides an acoustically superior product to generic insulation. Not only does it reduce exterior noise such as traffic and planes, but it also reduces the amount of interior noise. Flushing toilets, leaky pipes, running appliances, and similar interior noises are all reduced from room to room if TAP Insulation is installed.

Environmentally Friendly

The product is made from 80% recycled paper. Installation improves the carbon-footprint of homeowners and businesses by reducing the amount of energy they need to use. There is also no post-installation waste, which means nothing is going back into a landfill.

TAP Insulation is the only product to receive an Energy Star Label and noted by the EPA to control insects.

There really is no downside to TAP Insulation. As far as we’re concerned, less pests, lower energy bills, and less noise is a win-win-win.

Learn more about TAP Insulation at their site or contact Clegg’s to find out more about TAP Insulation installation in your home or business. As always you can call us at 888-672-5344.

Home Remedy Fact or Myth: Does Pouring Bleach Down the Drain Stop Roaches from Using It for Travel

American CockroachThe last thing you want to see as you stumble into the kitchen for breakfast is a roach skittering around in your sink. The shock will wake you up faster than any cup of coffee ever will, but the knowledge that roaches are using your drains as a sort of highway could turn the strongest of stomachs. These pests carry diseases with them and can live in between the walls of your home as well as your pipes.

You might have heard that you can pour bleach down your drains in order to stop roaches from using your plumbing to roam around your house. Most people know that bleach sprays can be used to kill errant roaches that skitter around your floors. In a desperate situation, you might be ready to put an entire jug of Clorox down your bathtub drain, but does it really work?

Bleach can kill roaches on contact, so pouring it down a drain will really only work if your plumbing is full of the pests. As roaches like to be close to a source of water, you could kill them and flush them out of your drains using this method. Following it up with a few cups of boiling water can catch any roaches that might have survived the bleach.

You need to be very careful about how and when you use bleach, as it is corrosive and toxic to humans just as it is to pests. If you pour it down your sink or into your toilet bowl, make sure that you keep a nearby window open for ventilation and that you do not get any bleach in your mouth or eyes. Wash your hands as thoroughly as possible after you are done, and store the bleach away from children or pets.

So as it turns out, using bleach to keep your drains roach-free might be a good idea. However, carefully pouring bleach down a drain is an efficient short term solution if you have spotted a few roaches in your sinks or your toilet and you can kill them immediately. If you have a full-blown infestation, you will definitely need to get in touch with a professional instead. Misusing bleach in an attempt to kill the roaches in your home could end up causing you harm as well.

Request cockroach service or call Clegg’s now at 888-672-5344.